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JumpJoy200In case some of you are wondering about adult ADDers taking medication and wanting to know if it helps, I thought I'd give my experience...

Once I was diagnosed a few years ago, it was suggested that I try taking Concerta to help with the challenges I was battling with. To be honest I thought only children with ADD took medication, but I was willing to try.

The most amazing thing for me was that INSTANTLY my anxiety disappeared, which I couldn't quite believe!

MistLakeWithGirlThe doctor who diagnosed me said that for many people that was the first thing that they noticed too. I think it must have something to do with the fact that for the first time my brain could think clearly and not through a 'fog', which is why I was constantly anxious.

Another way of explaining the feeling is that of someone with bad eyesight putting on glasses for the first time, suddenly everything is 'in focus' and not blurred and hazy. The result of everything being 'in-focus' is an amazing motivation to get things done (compared to procrastinating because it's such a huge effort to 'focus' your thoughts, and everything feels overwhelming).

Anxiety and depression can often be co-occurring conditions with ADD, but I think in my case they were a result of not coping with my ADD symptoms (which I knew nothing about until a few years ago), so lessened dramatically with the medication.

Another aspect for me was that I had more self-confidence. I think this is because I never quite trusted my ability to feel on-top of everything going on around me, everything felt like a blur, but with the medication felt completely focussed and 'engaged' in everything going on around me (I don't know if that makes sense, it's hard to explain?).

The difference was life-changing for me and was the 'first step'; the next step was going through the coaching process. Without a doubt doing the coaching with the help of the medication was amazing (I kept thinking how much more I would have got out of school and College if I'd been able to take it then!)

So for me personally, I am extremely grateful for the medication I take, and I know my brain obviously needs the chemicals to function like most people's do 'normally'. I have no problem taking it and to me it's a bit like a diabetic who needs to take insulin. God has blessed us with incredible doctors and medical research which is always discovering new ways to help people, and I am so grateful that I have been helped in this way!

I know of some people who feel more anxious on some medications, it's not always easy finding the right medication and dosage, but if you can it can change your life!I must add it's not a 'wonder-drug' that will take all your problems away (if I gave that impression), but it enables you to focus in such a way that you can deal with life so much more effectively.

It also cannot erase your past, and we still have to deal with issues in our lives in order to grow and move on, which is why the dual roles of medication and ADHD coaching work so well together.If you have positive or negative input to give on medication please do, it may be able to help someone else...



Know The Jargon - ADHD Acronyms

Here are some of the common ADHD acronyms and what they mean

ADDer - a person who has ADHD or ADD

ADHD - Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder

ADD - Attention Deficit Disorder

SCT - Sluggish Cognitive Tempo - new name for ADD

ODD - Oppositional Defiance Disorder

CD - Conduct Disorder

OCD - Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Bi-polar - Bi-polar Disorder, used to be Manic-Depression

SPD - Sensory Processing Disorder

PTSD - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

SAD - Seasonal Affective Disorder


ACT -  Action Consequence Trigger - monitoring forms devised and supplied by Living ADDventure®


The Living ADDventure® Basic Treatment Wheel

Click on the image to see a short video that explains the 8 different components.

ADHD Treatment Wheel

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